Visual Diaries

When I had to move into a bedsit accommodation and lost a 'studio' I found myself having to scale down my work to a handbag. Studio in a bag. I have always been an avid sketchbook enthusiast, but over the years they grew to be much more. The books started to tell a story. Working with this idea I have explored different ways of working in different books. I have allowed text and image to flirt with each other and memory, fantasy, observation, description onto the pages.

Visual Diary 2016. Work in progress.

I have enjoyed encouraging my grandchildren to draw in this years visual diary. Their drawings are delightful and add a charm to my page.

Silent Diary, 2015.

Experimenting with the random line that runs through my previous diaries, I decided to use orange Brusho dye to create shapes and spaces that I could respond to. I also decided to do observational drawings of life in front of me, and doodle when nothing around me interested me. I also decided to remove text and let the drawings speak for themselves. When reality became too hard I allowed fantasy to completely take over.

The Cape of Good Hope and Me. 2014.

This visual diary was made as a gift for a friends Judy and Graham who were kind enough to let us holiday at their lovely home for three Cape summers in a row. Many of the memories were shared between us.

Me at Sea. 2014.

'Me at Sea' was a diary completed on a sea cruise from Genoa to Cape Town. It was exhibeted on board and at the Wells Contemporary Art Competition, in Wells in 2014.

Kakamono. 2012.

Kakamono means scroll in Japanese. This drawing is an unraveling story of nights of insomnia, begun by placing random marks on the page with my Japanese brush. It was my conscious effort to focus on the positive and, while acknowledging the negative, concentrate on making something beautiful. 

 

I started learning to draw copying Disneyland magazines when I was very young. Make believe and imaginative stories followed me into my teaching career as an infant and preschool teacher. It is no surprise then that I see faces and desire to make them a reality. I find myself intrigued by this interpretation of 'Jack and the Magic Beanstalk'

'Imagination is more important than knowledge'. Albert Einstein

'Creativity is intelligence having fun.'

Albert Einstein

'Disneyland will never be completed.





It will continue to grow as long as

there is imagination left in th world'

                                   

Walt Disney

 

PAREIDOLIA, in a nutshell, is the ability to see faces, or other things, where there isn't one.

 

"In his notebooks, Leonardo da Vinci wrote of pareidolia as a device for painters, writing "if you look at any walls spotted with various stains.... if you are about to invent some scene you will be able to see in it a resemblance to various different landscapes adorned with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees, plains, wide valleys and various groups of hills. You will also be able to see divers, combats and figures in quick movement, and strange expressions of faces, and outlandish costumes, and an infinite number of things which you can then reduce into separate and well conceived forms."

 

Wikipedia 

 

These imaginings, or seeings, with the aid of drawing, become my Gazoonkas

Fran Webster's Art

 More of my work can be viewed on Redbubble. 

http://www.redbubble.com/people/franwebster

 

 

 

 

and on my face book art page

http://www.facebook.com/FranWebstersArt